Our podcast series are curated by a guest editor who presents a series framed by a theme or idea that is of interest or forms part of their research. The current series, Black-Magic, is produced and curated by Mxolisi Makhubo, the GSA’s Acting Architectural History and Theory Convenor.

Magic is the ability for a conjurer to reveal an aspect of the world as we had never seen before; rather than invent anew, the magic resides in the ability to set new networks of relationships, which is where the magic lives. The magical moment then is the disruption of presuppositions and the rendering of new possibilities. Adding the adjective 'black' to magic renders it a racialised site that works against the ontological bounds set by racism for people racialised as black. Therefore, to experience black magic is to experience a new set of networks that sets off relationships anew and presses us to recalibrate the epistemic grounding of what we imagine to be possible.

In the three-part series, Black-magic, I explore discursive methods that hint at other sets of relationships with temporality, land and other beings. The series is an attempt at what Emanuel Admassu calls the decoupling of architecture from constantly producing property. Said differently, the podcast aims to extract different epistemes making even broader the extensive possibilities of building our material and immaterial worlds beyond the bounds of capital.

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News 30 Sep 2021
Black-Magic Series | Podcast 02 w/ Sifiso Khanyile

In the second episode, we sat down with Sifiso Khanyile, an archive researcher and filmmaker working primarily in Johannesburg, South Africa. In the conversation, we explore his ethics to "working with other people's lives" and the work required in dignifying black life using innately violent apartheid-era archives.

News 26 Aug 2021
Black-Magic Series | Podcast 01 w/ Mpho Matsipa

"In our inaugural episode, I sit down with Mpho Matsipa, an educator, researcher, and curator based in South Africa. We discuss what she calls “thinking from blackness” and other epistemes for imagining freedom through expanding grammars of representation. We revisit her ongoing curatorial project, African Mobilities, to reflect on the generative dimensions of race. " - Mxolisi Makhubo